Different ways of writing arabic letters

Contact Welcome to the Basic Arabic Course! Welcome to the three-part Basic Arabic Course in which you will learn all the essentials of the Arabic language. Note, though, that this course is not meant to replace more established courses.

Different ways of writing arabic letters

Arabic numerals[ edit ] The handwritten numerals used in Western countries have two common forms: Old-style numerals are often used by British presses. Aside from these two main forms, other regional variations abound. The numeral 0 — Some writers put a diagonal slash through the numeral 0 zeroa practice that was used on some early, low-resolution computer terminals which displayed a slashed "zero" glyph to distinguish it from the capital letter O.

Forms that avoid confusion with Danish include: Confusion between the numeral 0 and the letter O can be resolved by using a script letter O with a loop at the top[1] and leaving the numeral 0 without embellishments; this was a common practice before use of the slashed zero became the norm[ citation needed ] The numeral 1 — This numeral is sometimes written with a serif at the top extending downward and to the left.

People in some parts of Europe extend this stroke nearly the whole distance to the baseline. It is sometimes written with horizontal serifs at the base; without them different ways of writing arabic letters can resemble the shape of the numeral 7, which has a near-vertical stroke without a crossbar, and a shorter horizontal top stroke.

This numeral is often written as a plain vertical line without an ear at the top; this form is easily confused with the capital letter I and with the lower-case letter L. This 2 can be confused with a capital script Q, or a letter Z.

This form is sometimes used to prevent people from fraudulently changing a three into an eight. In Taiwan, the top is often written with a diagonal line from the top left, and the overall figure may be so changed that to foreigners it is completely unrecognizable even as a number.

The numeral 4 — Some people leave the top "open" — all the lines are either vertical or horizontal, as in a seven segment display. This makes it easier to distinguish from the numeral 9. The numeral 5 — In Taiwan, the left vertical bar is extended upwards as a long stem.

If this is slanted, the overall figure may more closely resemble an uppercase Y. If casually written it can be confused with a letter S.

The Arabic Alphabet - Chart Click on a letter to see how to write it. Arabic Alphabet Chart; Letters in Different Positions: Initial, Medial and Final. Arabic letters have different forms whether they appear in the beginning, the middle or the end of the writing - or even isolated! After learning the Arabic alphabet in Part 1, you learn the different forms of the Arabic letters when they appear in actual words! Learning to write Aramaic on this page. This lesson introduces the major strains of written Aramaic: cursive script vs. square script. The two writing styles represent two separate traditions that come from one common early script.

The numeral 6 — Can be confused with a letter capital G, or the lower case b, or the nine if inverted.

It can also be written with a straight line rather than a curly line on top, appearing as b The numeral 7 — The traditional form found in copperplate penmanship begins with a serif at the upper left and has a wavy horizontal stroke a swash.

In East Asian countries Korea, China and Japanthis numeral is commonly written with such a serif, but no swash and no crossbar through the middle. It is usually written with just two strokes, the top horizontal and the usually angled vertical.

A short horizontal bar is sometimes used to cross the vertical in the middle, to distinguish the seven from a numeral one, especially in cultures such as French that write 1 with a very long upstroke. This form is used commonly throughout continental Europe, parts of the United States and frequently in Australia.

In Taiwan two horizontal bars are sometimes used, although an extra-long serif is the feature which most clearly distinguishes 7 from 1.

different ways of writing arabic letters

When the cross is added in the center it can cause confusion with a script capital F. The numeral 9 — In parts of Europe, this numeral is written with the vertical ending in a hook at the bottom.

This version resembles how the lowercase letter g is commonly written. Elsewhere the usual shape is to draw the vertical straight to the baseline. A nine may or may not appear with underlining or full stop as 9 or 9. In South Korea, the nine is written with the loop above or even to the right of the stick.

The backwards version can also be found in Southern Taiwan. The Latin writing system[ edit ] The lowercase letter a — Some writers put a double-story through the letter a, a practice that was used on some early, typefaces which displayed a hook top a.

Geometric basis of patterns

This practice conflicts with the use of the letter "a" in the Latin and Cyrillic small letters. The lowercase letter g — In Polish, this letter is often rendered with a straight descender without a hook or loop.

This effectively means that a handwritten g looks much like a q in other writing traditions.Mar 06,  · Writing all 26 letters of the English alphabet can seem like a challenge.

But if you are going to master the English language on the page, you will need to be able to use the alphabet to form words and sentences%(85). Mar 06,  · Writing all 26 letters of the English alphabet can seem like a challenge.

But if you are going to master the English language on the page, you will need to be able to use the alphabet to form words and sentences. This will help your child remember each letter and start to get a sense of the different shapes of each letter.

2 81%(64). Arabic letters have different forms whether they appear in the beginning, the middle or the end of the writing - or even isolated! After learning the Arabic alphabet in Part 1, you learn the different forms of the Arabic letters when they appear in actual words! The Arabic Alphabet - Chart Click on a letter to see how to write it.

different ways of writing arabic letters

Arabic Alphabet Chart; Letters in Different Positions: Initial, Medial and Final. for example, is Arabic usually written without vowels? The answer has to do with the underlying logic of the language. The section introducing the Arabic language is followed by a brief but fairly complete presentation of the whole alphabet and writing system.

A table of the main shapes of all the letters is given and their pronunciation discussed. Arabic language: How to Read and Write - easy way! (29 ratings) Arabic language: How to Read and Write - easy way!

Arabic letters have different forms whether they appear in the beginning, the middle or the end of the writing - or even isolated!

Types of writing systems