Essays in medieval chinese literature and cultural history

Literature represents much of the very best of humanity's writings, and it is not by any accident that, after bestsellers and sensationalized books have faded from memory, literature continues to thrive and remain intensely relevant to contemporary human conditions. Literature's stories and texts survive the fires of time. This is why for decades and centuries - long after their authors have gone silent - the writings of Dante, Shakespeare, and Austen, among so many other vital voices, will continue to captivate readers and comment upon life.

Essays in medieval chinese literature and cultural history

Dr Quimn, Mad Woman broadcast in There is a lesbian magazine titled Quimand related to the term are the portmanteau words 'queef', 'kweef', 'quiff', and 'queefage', all meaning 'vaginal fart' and derived from 'quim' in combination with 'whiff'.

Essays in Medieval Chinese Literature and Cultural History : Paul W. Kroll :

In addition to the clumsily Anglicised 'quim', 'cwm' was also adopted into English with the more accurate phonetic spelling 'coombe', from the Old English 'cumb'. Indeed, so common is the word in English placenames that Morecambe Bay is often mis-spelt Morecombe: There is also a song titled Biddy Mulligan: In America, 'combe' appears in the name of Buncombe County, from which the slang term 'bunkum' is derived.

Congressional representative Felix Walker, ending a long-winded House of Representatives speech ininsisted that he was "bound to make a speech for Buncombe" Jonathon Green, Thus, 'buncombe' became synonymous with nonsensical speech, and was later simplified to 'bunkum'.

We have seen how 'cu' originated as an ancient feminine term. In the Romance languages, the 'cu' prefix became 'co', as in 'coynte', the Italian 'conno' and 'cunno', the Portugese 'cona', and the Catalan 'cony'. This 'co' prefix may also suggest a possible link with the Old English 'cot', forerunner of 'cottage', and with 'cod' as in 'codpiece''cobweb', 'coop', 'cog', 'cock', 'chicken', 'cudgel', and 'kobold', though this is not proven.

The 'co' prefix is found most abundantly in Spanish, which provides 'concha' 'vagina''chocha' 'lagoon', a vaginal metaphorand 'cono' 'vagina'. Suzi Feay finds 'cono' preferable to the coarser-sounding 'cunt': There is also a Castilian Spanish variant 'conacho'and a milder euphemistic form: In Mexico, Spaniards are known colloquially as 'los conos', indicating Mexican surprise at the word's prevalence in Spain.

The transition from 'cu' to 'co' can be seen most clearly in the progression from the Old French 'cun' and 'cunne', to the Middle French 'com' and 'coun', and the modern French 'con'. These terms contain the letter 'n', and this is a clue that their evolution from 'cu' was indirect.

The missing link is the Latin term 'cuneus', meaning 'wedge'. Euphemistically, 'coin' means 'conceive', and 'coiner' can refer to a man who impregnates a woman, thus the word has a demonstrably sexual, if not explicitly genital, connection. Thus, 'cuneiform', 'coin', and 'cunt' share the same etymological origin: The connection between 'cuneus' and 'cunt' is 'cunnus' Latin for 'vagina'; perhaps also related to 'culus', meaning 'anus'and this connection is most clearly demonstrated by the term 'cunnilingus' 'oral stimulation of the vagina'.

In this combination of 'cunnus' and 'lingere' 'to lick'we can see that 'cunnus' is used in direct reference to the vagina, demonstrating that the 'cun' prefix it shares with 'cunt' is more than coincidental.

The adjective is 'cunnilingual', and cunnilinus is performed by a cunnilinguist. Another link is shown by the 'constrictor cunni', one of the muscles of the vagina.

Essays in medieval chinese literature and cultural history

Euphemistic variants of 'cunnilingus' include 'cunnilinctus', 'cumulonimbus', 'cunning lingus', 'Colonel Lingus' t-shirt slogan'dunnylingus' incorporating the slang 'dunny', meaning 'toilet', suggesting cunnilingus performed in a bathroom'cunnichingus' cunnilingus performed with the chin'conulingus' a contraction of 'con you cunnilingus'and "Canni langi" Michelle Hanson, It is often comically confused with 'cunning linguist', as in the Sluts song Cunning Linguistand was evoked by the Not The Nine O'Clock News song and album Viz has created the convoluted euphemisms 'cumulonimbicile' a combination of 'cumulonimbus' and a mis-spelling of 'imbicile', referring to a man who cannot perform cunnilingus"cumulously nimbate", and "cumulonimbulate" Roger Mellie, There are many terms derived from 'cunnus' that have either literal or metaphorical vaginal or maternal connotations: Also from 'cunnus' is 'cundy', which means 'underground water channel' and is slang for 'vaginal fluid', a vaginal metaphor in the manner of 'cwm'.Essays in Medieval Chinese Literature and Cultural History (Variorum Collected Studies Series) by Paul W.

Kroll () on initiativeblog.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying initiativeblog.comcturer: Routledge. Founded in , Macmillan Publishers is one of the largest global trade book publishers and home to numerous bestselling and award-winning fiction, nonfiction, and children’s books, from St.

Martin’s Press, Tor Books, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Henry Holt, Picador, Flatiron Books, Celadon Books, and Macmillan . September Remember the essays you had to write in high school? Topic sentence, introductory paragraph, supporting paragraphs, conclusion.

Fifty Essays

The conclusion being, say, that Ahab in Moby Dick was a Christ-like figure. Oy. Early medieval China, spanning the period from the last years of the Eastern, or Later Han dynasty (second century C.E.) to the early Tang in the seventh century, marks an era of profound change in Chinese history.

Chinese literature is increasingly available in translation- there are now several well-established websites sharing information, for example, Paper Republic, Writing Chinese, Chinese Short Stories, My Chinese Books, Chinese Books for Young Readers.

Essays in Medieval Chinese Literature and Cultural History by Paul W. Kroll (review) Xurong Kong China Review International, Volume 18, Number 3, , pp.

Essays in medieval chinese literature and cultural history

(Review).

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