Role of the midwife in care interventions

Benefits of Having a Midwife The term midwife reflects a philosophy of care that is directed toward women and their individual reproductive needs.

Role of the midwife in care interventions

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Background Maternity care providers, particularly midwives, have a window of opportunity to influence pregnant women about positive health choices.

This aim of this paper is to identify evidence of effective public health interventions from good quality systematic reviews that could be conducted by midwives.

Role of the midwife in care interventions

Quality assessment of all reviews was conducted. Results Thirty-six good quality systematic reviews were identified which reported on effective interventions.

What Is a Midwife? - Pregnancy - initiativeblog.com

The reviews were conducted on a diverse range of interventions across the reproductive continuum and were categorised under: The scope and strength of the review findings are discussed in relation to current practice.

A logic model was developed to provide an overarching framework of midwifery public health roles to inform research policy and practice. Conclusions This review provides a broad scope of high quality systematic review evidence and definitively highlights the challenge of knowledge transfer from research into practice.

The review also identified gaps in knowledge around the impact of core midwifery practice on public health outcomes and the value of this contribution.

This review provides evidence for researchers and funders as to the gaps in current knowledge and should be used to inform the strategic direction of the role of midwifery in public health in policy and practice.

Systematic review, Public health, Midwife, Pregnancy Background The reproductive period offers maternity care providers the opportunity to maximise the health and well-being of women and their families potentially impacting on public health outcomes, both short and long term.

Although all maternity care providers who engage with pregnant women are presented with such opportunities, it is the midwife that could have the most significant impact from regular contact and building of relationships through continuity of care.

There are interventions that could be implemented by midwives, which potentially would have a public health impact but it is important such interventions are evidence based.

Recognition of the importance of the relationship between public health and midwifery was highlighted when a general review of midwifery in the UK [ 1 ], named public health as one of five key areas of interest.

While the review specifically focused on midwifery in the UK, the importance of preventative public health interventions during pregnancy and the postnatal period has been emphasized on a wider scale.

Millennium Development Goal 5 focuses on improving maternal health specifying a secondary target aim to achieve universal access to reproductive health by [ 2 ].

Antenatal care and adolescent pregnancy are specifically mentioned as key to achieving this target, both of which are acknowledged widely, as areas of interest to public health [ 34 ].

Other areas of national and international interest, which impact on population health both women and familiesinclude rising caesarean section rates and other interventions during childbirth [ 5 - 7 ], the importance of positive parenting in the early postnatal period [ 8 ] and perinatal mental health [ 9 ].

Within these areas there is opportunity for evidence based public health interventions to be implemented with a view to potentially improving the long term health of women and families. Aim of the review This paper presents an update of a systematic review of systematic reviews conducted in The aim of the review was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions relevant to the public health role of the midwife.

The review was commissioned and conducted within the context of the Midwifery initiative. The final report of the Midwifery initiative Delivering Expectations and full report of the systematic review of reviews [ 10 ] are available freely online from: A systematic review of systematic reviews was selected as the methodology, given the breadth of this topic area and the timescale of the project.Various roles and responsibilities of a midwife have presented in the below: Care giver: Midwives provide high quality antenatal and postnatal care to maximize the women’s health during and after pregnancy, detect problems early and .

The role of a midwife. Midwifery covers many aspects of support during pregnancy. As long as everything is normal in pregnancy, a midwife can generally provide all of your antenatal care. If complications arise, a midwife will refer you to a doctor who is trained to deal with special situations.

Although the midwife is not generally involved in the very early stages of pregnancy, there is good evidence that prenatal involvement in terms of preparation of the woman for the process of childbirth will reduce the incidence of stress incontinence post partum.

Role of the midwife in care interventions

Maternity care providers, particularly midwives, have a window of opportunity to influence pregnant women about positive health choices. This aim of this paper is to identify evidence of effective public health interventions from good quality systematic reviews that could be conducted by midwives.

The public health role of the midwives has not been well researched or reviewed and the impact of everyday midwifery practice on longer term, holistic maternal and family well-being outcomes is poorly articulated in review literature. A shift in research, policy and practice is needed to fully articulate the public health role of the midwife.

The midwife is recognised as a responsible and accountable professional who. works in partnership with women to give the necessary support, care and advice. during pregnancy, labour and the postpartum period, to conduct births on the.

midwife's own responsibility and to provide care for the newborn and the infant.

The role of the midwife: time for a review | RCM